Projects

Scientific understanding of climatic processes is furthered by projects tailored to address specific problems. Use the drop-down menu above or the sidebar to the right to read about the projects which the African Climate group at Oxford are involved in or lead.

African Climate Atlas

The African Climate Atlas is an interactive plotting tool with options including satellite, model and observed data.

BoDEx – The Bodélé Dust Experiment

This project uncovered the controls on the world’s single dustiest location, the Bodélé Depression in Chad.

CCAFS – Climate Change and Food Security

Climate models can be a powerful tool to understand the effects of climate change on agriculture, if they are used appropriately.

CLARIFY – Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Interactions and Forcing

Cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions are one of the largest uncertainties in climate change; the south east Atlantic is a natural laboratory to study them.

DO4 Models – Dust Observations for Models

This project aims to reconcile micro-scale dust emission observation with climate model gridbox parameterisations.

Fennec – The Saharan Climate System

The central Sahara is of global climatic importance yet observations of the region have been almost completely absent – until now.

IMPALA – Improving Model Processes for African Climate

This project aims to deliver a step change in predictive capability for Africa on 5-40 year timescales.

Rainfall variability and change

An ongoing research theme rather than one project, we study the mechanisms of African rainfall variability and change in both observations and model simulations.

REACH

Water security is a multi-dimensional problem. We are leading the climate research component of this 7-year programme.

UMFULA – Uncertainty reduction in Models for Understanding Development Applications

Part of the Future Climate For Africa project focusing on south-central Africa, joint-funded by the Department for International Development and the Natural Environment Research Council.

 

Airborne fieldwork over the Erg Chech, Mali

Airborne fieldwork over the Erg Chech, Mali during the Fennec Project. (c) Christopher Allen.

 

Oxford University is a member of the Met Office Academic Partnership, a formal collaboration to advance the science and skill of weather and climate prediction. More information can be found here http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/partnership.

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